Wednesday, 25 May 2016

ROV VS. FIBER-OPTIC CAMERA - WRECK EXPLORATION.

‘The fiber optic Seaeye Falcon DR represents an ideal balance of capability and ease of mobilization in a small, powerful and stable package. By deploying from a relatively inexpensive vessel of opportunity, project budget is conserved allowing for a longer, more detailed campaign. Running a wide bandwidth fiber optic system means the vehicle is able to support a host of sensors and cameras normally only found on larger vehicles.’


The Falcon DR has a world-wide following with over 220 in use offshore, inshore and down tunnels.
Users are attracted by the Falcon’s reputation for power, reliability and unequalled stability in strong cross-currents − particularly in a vehicle small enough to be manhandled into the water.
Rapid role-change during operations is a key feature where intelligent electronics offer a ‘plug and go’ simplicity that allows up to 128 devices to be added and changed easily, such as extra cameras, lights, tracking system, manipulator and sonar, plus the option of adding special tooling on a removable skid.
Its unrivalled finger-tip manoeuvrability comes from five brushless DC thrusters with velocity feedback for precise and rapid control in all directions and an ability to hold steady in strong cross currents.
The deep rated Falcon has built-in fibre optics for high volume data transmission over its long umbilical, and the ability to use broadcast quality video cameras. It also has tilting variable intensity lights linked to its camera tilt mechanism for superior illumination when filming above or below the vehicle.
Saab Seaeye is the largest and most trusted manufacturer of electrically operated ROVs in the world. Its parent, Saab Underwater Systems is itself a world leader in sensor systems, precision engagement systems, and remotely operated and autonomous underwater vehicles.
http://www.seaviewsystems.com/2011/06/hattie-wells-shipwreck-lake-michigan/


No comments: